Culture Econimic Development, and American Indian Nations

Steven Cornell
What Explains Economic Development? Culture and Institutions in Indian Nations
October 10, 2000, 3:30PM, 8417 Social Sciences
Culture as Explanation In Racial and Ethnic Inequality: Poverty And Propsperity on American Indian Reservations
October 11, 2000, 3:30PM, 8417 Social Science
Seminar for Students and Faculty
October 12, 2000, 12:20PM, 8108 Social Science

    Stephen Cornell is director of the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy and Professor of Sociology and of Public Administration and Policy at The University of Arizona. He is also co-director of the Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University. A specialist in political economy and cultural sociology, Professor Cornell has written widely on Indian affairs, economic development, collective identity, and ethnic and race relations. His publications include The Return of the Native: American Indian Political Resurgence (Oxford, 1988); What Can Tribes Do? Strategies and Institutions in American Indian Economic Development (UCLA, 1992), co-edited with Joseph P. Kalt; and Ethnicity and Race: Making Identities in a Changing World (Pine Forge, 1998), co-authored with Douglas Hartmann. Professor Cornell has spent much of the last fifteen years working closely with Indian nations in the United States and Canada on self-governance, economic development, and tribal policy issues. Among his recent policy-related projects are a study of the on-and-off-reservation economic and social impacts of Indian gaming operations and an analysis of Native self-governance in Alaska.