Race and Region in the Making of the Modern Right

Picture 2.jpg
The Havens Center Spring 2007 Visiting Scholars Program presents
Nancy Maclean
“Freedom Is Not Enough: The Opening of the American Workplace”
Tuesday, March 20, 4pm, 206 Ingraham
“Southern Dominance in Borrowed Language: The Regional Origins of American Neo-Liberalism”
Wednesday, March 21, 4pm, 8417 Social Science
Public Seminar: “Neo-Confederacy vs. the New Deal: The Regional Utopia of the Modern American Right”
Thursday, March 22, 12:20 pm, 8108 Social Science

Nancy MacLean (Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, 1989) studies the workings of class, gender, race, and region in twentieth-century social movements and public policy. Her first book, Behind the Mask of Chivalry: The Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan (New York: Oxford University Press, 1994), was named a “noteworthy” book of the year by the New York Times Book Review, and received the Rawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians, the Owsley Prize from the Southern Historical Association, and the Rosenhaupt Award from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation.
Her most recent book is Freedom Is Not Enough: The Opening of the American Workplace (Harvard University Press, 2006). The recipient of an Outstanding Book Award from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights, the book demonstrates the centrality of the fight for jobs and justice to the black freedom movement, the Mexican American civil rights movement, and the feminist movement, as it reveals new dimensions of conservative opposition to all three. Advancing a new interpretation of U.S. history over the last fifty years, it
shows how the interactions between these groups changed the country.
She is currently completing two books for course use. The Modern Women’s Movement: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford/St. Martin’s, forthcoming 2007), and Debating the Conservative Movement: 1945 to the Present, with Donald T. Critchlow (Rowman & Littlefield, forthcoming 2008). Her articles have appeared in Feminist Studies, Gender & History, In These Times, Labor, Labor History, the Journal of American History, The Nation, and the OAH Magazine of History. A recipient of fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Russell Sage Foundation, as well as Northwestern’s Institute for Policy Research and Kaplan Humanities Center, she is one of the department’s several Charles Deering McCormick Professors of Teaching Excellence. MacLean also serves as co-chair of the Chicago Center for Working-Class Studies.