Tag: 2017 Fall

After Capitalism?

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David Schweickart
"What’s Wrong with Capitalism?"
Tuesday, September 26, 4pm, 6191 Helen C. White
"Where Do We Want to Go? How Might We Get There?"
Wednesday, September 27, 4pm, 6191 Helen C. White
Open Seminar for students, faculty, and public
Thursday, September 28, 12:20pm, 8108 Social Science

DAVID SCHWEICKART is Professor of Philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.  He holds Ph.D's in mathematics and philosophy. He is the author of Capitalism or Worker Control? An Ethical and Economic Appraisal (Praeger, 1980), Against Capitalism (Cambridge, 1993), Market Socialism: The Debate Among Socialists (Routledge, 1998; coauthored with Bertell Ollman, Hillel Ticktin and James Lawler), and After Capitalism (Rowman and Littlefield, 2002). He is also the author of numerous articles in social-political philosophy. His primary focus has been on developing and defending, as both economically viable and ethically desirable, a socialist alternative to capitalism, which he calls Economic Democracy. His work has been translated into Chinese, Spanish, French, Norwegian, Slovak, Farsi, and Catalan. 

READING: 

Dismantling Solidarity

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Michael McCarthy
"Dismantling Solidarity: Capitalist Politics and Retirement Income since the New Deal"
Monday, October 2, 12 noon, 8108 Social Science

Co-sponsored by the UW Sociology Politics, Culture and Society Brownbag

MICHAEL McCARTHY is assistant professor of sociology in the Department of Social and Cultural Sciences at Marquette University. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology from New York University and was a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies. His research is on the politics of capitalism, exploring the ways state policy bears on work, redistributes market risks and inequalities, and shapes global processes of financialization. He is the author of Dismantling Solidarity: Capitalist Politics and American Pensions since the New Deal (Cornell University Press, 2017), which explores the sociological causes of the current crisis in retirement. 

Why have capitalist markets come to play a growing role in the distribution of retirement income in the US since the New Deal? Drawing on rich archival data that covers more than fifty years of American history, this talk argues that the critical driver was policymakers’ reactions to capitalist crises and their political imperative to promote capitalist growth.  

Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America

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Nancy MacLean
"Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America"
Thursday, October 5, 7pm, Madison Labor Temple, Room 201, 1602 S Park St.

Co-sponsored by the UW-Madison Intellectual History Group, the UW-Madison Department of History, the South Central Federation of Labor (SCFL), Our Wisconsin Revolution, and the Madison Institute.

NANCY MACLEAN is the William H. Chafe Professor of History and Public Policy at Duke University. MacLean is an award-winning scholar of the twentieth-century U.S., whose new book, Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America, has been described by Publishers Weekly as “a thoroughly researched and gripping narrative… [and] a feat of American intellectual and political history.” Booklist called it “perhaps the best explanation to date of the roots of the political divide that threatens to irrevocably alter American government.” MacLean is the author of four other books, including Freedom is Not Enough: The Opening of the American Workplace (2006), called by the Chicago Tribune "contemporary history at its best,” and Behind the Mask of Chivalry: The Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan, named a New York Times "noteworthy" book of 1994.

Legacies of Fascism: Race and the Far-Right in the Making of the Cold War

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Alexander Anievas
"Reassessing the Cold War and the Politics of the Far-Right: Fascist Legacies and the Origins of the Liberal International Order after 1945"
Tuesday, October 10, 4pm, 6191 Helen C. White
"Defending White Supremacy at Home, Projecting Liberalism Abroad: Race, Anti-Communism, and the Making of US Hegemony"
Wednesday, October 11, 4pm, 6191 Helen C. White
Open Seminar for students, faculty, and public
Thursday, October 12, 12:20pm, 8108 Social Science

Co-sponsored by the UW Center for German & European Studies, the Department of History, the Center for Humanities, the International Institute, and the Afro-American Studies Department.

ALEXANDER ANIEVAS is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Connecticut. Dr. Anievas studies international relations, with a particular focus on the development of non-Eurocentric approaches to international historical sociology and political economy. He has held fellowships at the University of Oxford and University of Cambridge. He is the author of Capital, the State, and War: Class Conflict and Geopolitics in the Thirty Years’ Crisis, 1914-1945 (University of Michigan Press, 2014), for which he was awarded the Sussex International Theory Book Prize, and co-author (with Kerem Nişancıoğlu) of How the West Came to Rule: The Geopolitical Origins of Capitalism (Pluto, 2015). He is also the editor or co-editor of five books, including Historical Sociology and World History: Uneven and Combined Development over the Longue Durée, Cataclysm 1914: The First World and the Making of Modern World Politics, and Marxism and World Politics: Contesting Global Capitalism. He is currently working on a manuscript (with Richard Saull) entitled Legacies of Fascism: Race and the Far-Right in the Making of the Cold War.

The Right to Stay Home: Justice for Migrant Workers and Sending Communities

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David Bacon
"Documenting the Farm Worker Rebellion"
Tuesday, October 31, 4pm, 6191 Helen C. White
"The Radical Resistance to Immigration Enforcement"
Wednesday, November 1, 4pm, 6191 Helen C. White
Open Seminar for students, faculty, and public
Thursday, November 2, 12:20pm, 8108 Social Science

Co-sponsored by the Chican@ & Latin@ Studies Program, the Comparative US Studies Program, the Latin American, Caribbean, & Iberian Studies Program, and the UW School for Workers.

DAVID BACON is a California-based writer and photographer, and former union organizer.  He is the author of several books about migration:  The Children of NAFTA: Communities Without Borders, Illegal People: How Globalization Creates Migration and Criminalizes Immigrants, and The Right to Stay Home. His latest book is In the Fields of the North / En los Campos del Norte, copublished by the University of California Press (Berkeley) and the Colegio de la Frontera Norte (Tijuana), which documents the lives of farm workers in photographs and narratives. Bacon was a factory worker and union organizer for two decades with the United Farm Workers, the International Ladies Garment Workers, the United Electrical Workers and other unions. Today he documents the changing conditions in the workforce, the impact of the global economy, war and migration, and the struggle for human rights. His photography has been exhibited in the U.S., Mexico, and Europe, and his articles and photoessays have been published widely. David Bacon has been documenting the lives of farm workers through photographs and journalism since 1988.