Tag: 2014 Fall

Social Injustice in the Global Food Chain: Labor Rights & Working Conditions in Agriculture

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Peter Hurst
“Social Injustice and Hired Agricultural Workers in the Global Food Chain”
Tuesday, October 7, 4pm, 206 Ingraham
“The Global Food Chain and Child Labor Elimination in Agriculture and Fisheries”
Wednesday, October 8, 4pm, 8417 Social Science
Open Seminar for Students, Faculty and Public
Thursday, October 9, 12:20 pm, 8108 Social Science
“Sustainable Agriculture, Fair Trade and Cooperatives”
Friday, October 10, 7pm, Goodman Community Center, Boltz Room A

Co-sponsored by Global Studies, the UW Center for Cooperatives, and the UW Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems.

PETER HURST has 23 years of international experience in over over 90 countries dealing with a wide spectrum of labor-related agricultural issues in the global food chain. His activities remain focused on: labor rights, standards, and working conditions for workers in agriculture, including migrant workers; sustainable agriculture, rural development, and world food security; the elimination of child labor; and safety, health, environmental, and pollution prevention issues, with a special focus on pesticides. Peter continues to work, train and publish extensively on these subjects for a range of governments, international organisations, trade unions, private companies, and NGOs. He is currently working in Malawi, especially with the National Association of Smallholder Farmers, on promoting youth employment in agriculture; and on health, safety and migrant workers’ issues with the National Fisheries Association of Thailand.

READING: 

“Against the Public”: Teachers, Unions, and the Decline of Labor-Liberalism in the 1970s

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Jon Shelton
“Teacher Strikes, the Public Interest, and the Neoliberal Turn of the 1970s”
Tuesday, October 14, 4pm, 206 Ingraham Hall
“‘Compulsory Unionism’ in the Public Sector: Free Market Activism and the Eclipse of Labor-Liberalism”
Wednesday, October 15, 4pm, 8417 Social Science
Open Seminar for Students, Faculty and Public
Thursday, October 16, 12:20 pm, 8108 Social Science

Co-sponsored by Global Studies

JON SHELTON is Assistant Professor of Democracy and Justice Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, where he teaches courses on modern American history, labor history, and the history of education.  He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Maryland, College Park in 2013, and his dissertation—Against the Public: Teacher Strikes and the Decline of Liberalism, 1968-81—recently won the Labor and Working Class History Association’s 2013 Herbert Gutman Award for Outstanding Dissertation.  

READINGS: 

The Schools We Need: The Pursuit of Equity and Justice in American Education

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Pedro Noguera
“Education and Civil Rights in the 21st Century”
Wednesday, October 29, 4pm, 206 Ingraham Hall
Open Seminar for Students, Faculty and Public
Thursday, October 30, 12:20pm, 8108 Social Science
“Transforming Schools: The limits and Possibilities of School Reform”
Thursday, October 30, 4pm, 8417 Social Science

PEDRO NOGUERA is the Peter L. Agnew Professor of Education at New York University. Dr. Noguera’s scholarship and research focus on the ways in which schools are influenced by social and economic conditions and the factors that obstruct and promote student achievement. He is the author of several books, including: The Imperatives of Power: Political Change and the Social Basis of Regime Support in Grenada; City Schools and the American Dream; Unfinished Business: Closing the Achievement Gap in Our Nation’s Schools; The Trouble With Black Boys…and Other Reflections on Race, Equity and the Future of Public Education; Creating the Opportunity to Learn; Invisible No More: Understanding and Responding to the Disenfranchisement of Latino Males; and Schooling for Resilience. 

READINGS: 

Philosophy & the Contemporary World

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Alain Badiou
"Is Philosophy Able to Think the Present?"
Tuesday, December 9, 7:30pm, Elvehjem L160
"The Ideological Structure of the Contemporary World"
Wednesday, December 10, 7:30pm, Elvehjem L160
Open Seminar for Students, Faculty and Public
Thursday, December 11, 12:20pm, 8108 Social Science

Co-sponsored by the UW Center for the Humanities and the UW Philosophy Department

ALAIN BADIOU holds the Rene Descartes Chair at the European Graduate School (EGS). Badiou was a student at the École Normale Supérieure (ENS) in the 1950s. He taught at the University of Paris VIII (Vincennes-Saint Denis) from 1969 until 1999, when he returned to ENS as the Chair of the philosophy department. He continues to teach a popular seminar at the Collège International de Philosophie, on topics ranging from the great 'antiphilosophers' (Saint-Paul, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, Lacan) to the major conceptual innovations of the twentieth century. Much of Badiou's life has been shaped by his dedication to the consequences of the May 1968 revolt in Paris. He is the author of several successful novels and plays as well as more than a dozen philosophical works.