Tag: Neoliberalism

Race and Region in the Making of the Modern Right

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The Havens Center Spring 2007 Visiting Scholars Program presents
Nancy Maclean
“Freedom Is Not Enough: The Opening of the American Workplace”
Tuesday, March 20, 4pm, 206 Ingraham
“Southern Dominance in Borrowed Language: The Regional Origins of American Neo-Liberalism”
Wednesday, March 21, 4pm, 8417 Social Science
Public Seminar: “Neo-Confederacy vs. the New Deal: The Regional Utopia of the Modern American Right”
Thursday, March 22, 12:20 pm, 8108 Social Science

Nancy MacLean (Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, 1989) studies the workings of class, gender, race, and region in twentieth-century social movements and public policy. Her first book, Behind the Mask of Chivalry: The Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan (New York: Oxford University Press, 1994), was named a “noteworthy” book of the year by the New York Times Book Review, and received the Rawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians, the Owsley Prize from the Southern Historical Association, and the Rosenhaupt Award from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation.
Her most recent book is Freedom Is Not Enough: The Opening of the American Workplace (Harvard University Press, 2006). The recipient of an Outstanding Book Award from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights, the book demonstrates the centrality of the fight for jobs and justice to the black freedom movement, the Mexican American civil rights movement, and the feminist movement, as it reveals new dimensions of conservative opposition to all three. Advancing a new interpretation of U.S. history over the last fifty years, it
shows how the interactions between these groups changed the country.
She is currently completing two books for course use. The Modern Women’s Movement: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford/St. Martin’s, forthcoming 2007), and Debating the Conservative Movement: 1945 to the Present, with Donald T. Critchlow (Rowman & Littlefield, forthcoming 2008). Her articles have appeared in Feminist Studies, Gender & History, In These Times, Labor, Labor History, the Journal of American History, The Nation, and the OAH Magazine of History. A recipient of fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Russell Sage Foundation, as well as Northwestern’s Institute for Policy Research and Kaplan Humanities Center, she is one of the department’s several Charles Deering McCormick Professors of Teaching Excellence. MacLean also serves as co-chair of the Chicago Center for Working-Class Studies.

Imagining a Post-Neoliberal World: Culture and Social Movements

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Sujatha Fernandes
“What Comes After Neoliberalism? Collective Action and the Hybrid State in Chávez’s Venezuela”
Tuesday, March 27, 4pm, 206 Ingraham Hall
“'I’m an African': Black Aesthetics and the Making of a Hip Hop Globe”
Wednesday, March 28, 4pm, 8417 Social Science
Open Seminar for Students, Faculty and Public
Thursday, March 29, 12:20pm, 8108 Social Science

Co-sponsored by GLOBAL STUDIES and the OFFICE OF MULTICULTURAL ARTS INITIATIVES

SUJATHA FERNANDES is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Queens College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York. She is the author, most recently, of Close to the Edge: In Search of the Global Hip Hop Generation (Verso, 2011). Her other books are Cuba Represent! Cuban Arts, State Power, and the Making of New Revolutionary Cultures (Duke University Press, 2006) and Who Can Stop the Drums? Urban Social Movements in Chávez’s Venezuela (Duke University Press, 2010). Fernandes has written about social movements, global hip hop, and the politics of neoliberalism in both academic journals and popular forums, including The New York Times, The Nation, The Huffington Post, and Colorlines.

 

READING:

Urban Education, Neoliberal Responses to Crisis, and Their Contradictions

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Pauline Lipman
“Education and urban crises: coercive neoliberalism and the politics of disposability”
Tuesday, March 5, 4pm, 206 Ingraham Hall
“Dimensions of an emergent counter-hegemony in education: Reflections on Chicago”
Wednesday, March 6, 4pm, 206 Ingraham Hall
Open Seminar for Students, Faculty and Public
Thursday, March 7, 12:20pm, 8108 Social Science

PAULINE LIPMAN is professor of Educational Policy Studies and Director of the Collaborative for Equity and Justice in Education at the University of Illinois-Chicago. Her teaching, research, and activism grow out of her commitment to social justice and liberation. Her interdisciplinary research focuses on race and class inequality in education, globalization, and political economy of urban education, particularly the inter-relationship of education policy, urban restructuring, and the politics of race. Pauline is the author of numerous journal articles, book chapters, and policy reports. Her newest book, The New Political Economy of Urban Education: Neoliberalism, Race, and the Right to the City (Routledge, 2011), argues that education is integral to neoliberal economic and spatial urban restructuring and its class and race inequalities and exclusions as well as to the potential for a new, radically democratic economic and political social order. Her previous book, High Stakes Education and Race, Class and Power in School Restructuring, received American Education Studies Association, Critics Choice Awards. In 2011, she received the American Education Research Association Distinguished Contribution to Social Contexts in Education Research, Lifetime Achievement Award.

READINGS:

At Work with Bourdieu

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Rick Fantasia
"Reign of le Terroir: French Gastronomy in the Age of Neo-Liberalism”
Tuesday, March 19, 4pm, 206 Ingraham Hall
"Labor Solidarity: From Social Drama to Practical Myth"
Wednesday, March 20, 4pm, 8417 Social Science
Open Seminar for Students, Faculty and Public
Thursday, March 21, 12:20pm, 8108 Social Science

RICK FANTASIA is the Barbara Richmond 1940 Professor in the Social Sciences and Professor of Sociology at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts. His research has been driven by questions of labor and of culture, and their interpenetration, both in the U.S. and in France. He writes periodically for Le Monde Diplomatique and is the author of Cultures of Solidarity and co-author (with Kim Voss) of Hard Work. His recent research has concerned the symbolic economy of French gastronomy and the dynamics of its transformation as a cultural field.

READINGS:

“Against the Public”: Teachers, Unions, and the Decline of Labor-Liberalism in the 1970s

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Jon Shelton
“Teacher Strikes, the Public Interest, and the Neoliberal Turn of the 1970s”
Tuesday, October 14, 4pm, 206 Ingraham Hall
“‘Compulsory Unionism’ in the Public Sector: Free Market Activism and the Eclipse of Labor-Liberalism”
Wednesday, October 15, 4pm, 8417 Social Science
Open Seminar for Students, Faculty and Public
Thursday, October 16, 12:20 pm, 8108 Social Science

Co-sponsored by Global Studies

JON SHELTON is Assistant Professor of Democracy and Justice Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, where he teaches courses on modern American history, labor history, and the history of education.  He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Maryland, College Park in 2013, and his dissertation—Against the Public: Teacher Strikes and the Decline of Liberalism, 1968-81—recently won the Labor and Working Class History Association’s 2013 Herbert Gutman Award for Outstanding Dissertation.  

READINGS: