Social Cinema 2013 Schedule

The UW-Madison Havens Center’s Annual Film Series explores contemporary social topics from critical perspectives. The series is designed to appeal to a broad audience of students, faculty, and the general public who not only love film but are also interested in engaging in a discussion of significant social, political, and economic issues explored through film. Each screening is followed by a conversation led by a facilitator or facilitators well versed in the topic covered by the film.

Social Cinema is organized in collaboration with the Wisconsin Union Directorate Film Committee, and is screened at the Marquee Theater, the beautiful state-of-the-art cinema in the new Union South, located at 1308 W. Dayton Street in Madison. The series is free and open to all.

Terms and Conditions May Apply

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You have clicked on them many times: “I agree to the Terms and Conditions of this web site.” But you never read them. But by agreeing, you empower the surveillance state by giving the government data through corporations that it cannot get directly from you. This shocking film should dramatically change the way you use the internet.

Co-sponsored by the National Lawyers Guild – UW, ACLU of Wisconsin, and American Constitution Society.


Shadows of Liberty

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Shadows of Liberty reveals the extraordinary truth behind the news media: censorship, cover-ups and corporate control. In highly revealing stories, renowned journalists, activists and academics give insider accounts of a broken media system. Controversial news reports are suppressed, people are censored for speaking out, and lives are shattered as the arena for public expression is turned into a private profit zone. Why have we let a handful of powerful corporations write the news? We’re left in no doubt – media reform is urgent and freedom of the press is fundamental.

Co-sponsored by The Progressive Magazine and the Wisconsin Democracy Campaign


Gasland 2

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In this explosive follow-up to his Oscar®-nominated film GASLAND, filmmaker Josh Fox uses his trademark dark humor to take a deeper, broader look at the dangers of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, the controversial method of extracting natural gas and oil, now occurring on a global level (in 32 countries worldwide).

GASLAND PART II, which premiered at the 2013 Tribeca Film Festival, shows how the stakes have been raised on all sides in one of the most important environmental issues facing our nation today. The film argues that the gas industry’s portrayal of natural gas as a clean and safe alternative to oil is a myth and that fracked wells inevitably leak over time, contaminating water and air, hurting families, and endangering the earth’s climate with the potent greenhouse gas, methane. In addition the film looks at how the powerful oil and gas industries are in Fox’s words “contaminating our democracy”.

Co-sponsored by Citizens Climate Lobby, Clean Wisconsin, Crawford Stewardship Project, F.H. King Students for Sustainable Agriculture, Madison Environmental Group, Sierra Student Coalition, 350 Madison


The Human Scale

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This is a visually stunning film about urban planning. Yep! Hear from architects and planners as they look at what makes cities awful and what makes cities wonderful. They believe that if we research what makes cities great, we can plan thoughtfully for the inevitable growth of the world’s cities WITH A FOCUS ON PEOPLE.

The Human Scale questions our assumptions about modernity, exploring what happens when we put people into the center of our equations.

For 40 years the Danish architect Jan Gehl has systematically studied human behavior in cities. His starting point was an interest in people, more than buildings – in what he called Life Between Buildings. What made it exist? When was it destroyed? How could it be brought back? This lead to studies of how human beings use the streets, how they walk, see, rest, meet, interact etc.

Jan Gehl also uses statistics, but the questions he asks are different. For instance: How many people pass this street throughout a 24 hour period? How many percent of those are pedestrians? How many are driving cars or bikes? How much of the street space are the various groups allowed to use? Is this street performing well for all its users?

Jan Gehl made his first studies in Italy and later he inspired the planning of Denmark’s capital, Copenhagen, for 40 years. His ideas inspired the creation of walking streets, the building and improvements of bike paths and the reorganization of parks, squares and other public spaces throughout this city and in many other cities in the Nordic region.

Around the world cities like Melbourne, Dhaka, New York, Chongqing and Christchurch are now also being inspired by Gehl’s work and by the developments in Copenhagen.

Join Katherine Cornwell, Director of Planning Division, City of Madison, and Kate Stalker, Madison Project Director for the Center for Resilient Cities, for a discussion after the film.

Co-sponsored by 1000 Friends of Wisconsin and the Capital Area Planning Conference. 


More Than Honey

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Join Nathan Clarke of Mad Urban Bees for a discussion after the film.

Co-sponsored by FairShare CSA Coalition, F.H. King Students for Sustainable Agriculture, Mad Urban Bees LLC, Willy Street Grocery Coop.

Once you watch the trailer online, you’ll really want to see the film. It is visually stunning and has rare footage of humans doing the jobs of bees…. an army of humans hand pollinating fruit trees in China.

Synopsis from the filmmakers:

Over the past 15 years, numerous colonies of bees have been decimated throughout the world, but the causes of this disaster remain unknown. Depending on the world region, 50% to 90% of all local bees have disappeared, and this epidemic is still spreading from beehive to beehive – all over the planet. Everywhere, the same scenario is repeated: billions of bees leave their hives, never to return. No bodies are found in the immediate surroundings, and no visible predators can be located.

In the US, the latest estimates suggest that a total of 1.5 million (out of 2.4 million total beehives) have disappeared across 27 states. In Germany, according to the national beekeepers association, one fourth of all colonies have been destroyed, with losses reaching up to 80% on some farms. The same phenomenon has been observed in Switzerland, France, Italy, Portugal, Greece, Austria, Poland and England, where this syndrome has been nicknamed “the Mary Celeste Phenomenon”, after a ship whose crew vanished in 1872.

Scientists have found a name for the phenomenon that matches its scale, “colony collapse disorder,” and they have good reason to be worried: 80% of plant species require bees to be pollinated. Without bees, there is no pollinization, and fruits and vegetables could disappear from the face of the Earth. Apis mellifera (the honey bee), which appeared on Earth 60 million years before man and is as indispensable to the economy as it is to man’s survival.

Should we blame pesticides or even medication used to combat them? Maybe look at parasites such as varroa mites? New viruses? Travelling stress? The multiplication of electromagnetic waves disturbing the magnetite nanoparticles found in the bees’ abdomen? So far, it looks like a combination of all these agents has been responsible for the weakening of the bees’ immune defenses.


The House I Live In

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Co-sponsored by Madison-Area Urban Ministry

Watch the trailer online. While the full film is available to watch online, we encourage you to see it on the big screen and join in our discussion after the film. Read more about the film online, including updates on the drug war today.

From the filmmakers:

As America remains embroiled in conflict overseas, a less visible war is taking place at home, costing countless lives, destroying families, and inflicting untold damage on future generations of Americans. Over forty years, the War on Drugs has accounted for more than 45 million arrests, made America the world’s largest jailer, and damaged poor communities at home and abroad. Yet for all that, drugs are cheaper, purer, and more available today than ever before. Filmed in more than twenty states, The House I Live In captures heart-wrenching stories from individuals at all levels of America’s War on Drugs. From the dealer to the grieving mother, the narcotics officer to the senator, the inmate to the federal judge, the film offers a penetrating look inside America’s longest war, offering a definitive portrait and revealing its profound human rights implications.

While recognizing the seriousness of drug abuse as a matter of public health, the film investigates the tragic errors and shortcomings that have meant it is more often treated as a matter for law enforcement, creating a vast machine that feeds largely on America’s poor, and especially on minority communities. Beyond simple misguided policy, The House I Live In examines how political and economic corruption have fueled the war for forty years, despite persistent evidence of its moral, economic, and practical failures.